Funding Cuts, Shrinking Endowments, Tourism Declines

Brooklyn Museum at Night
Brooklyn Museum at Night

From http://www.crainsnewyork.com

“We’re all scrambling to come to terms with how to deal with the weakening financial situation in a way that inflicts the least short- and long-term damage to our institutions,” says Arnold Lehman, director of the Brooklyn Museum. “There really are no bright spots I can see at this time.”

Hit with steep cuts in public funding, as well as declines in earned income and corporate and foundation grants, museums throughout the city are slashing budgets, laying off staff and doing everything else they can to operate with dwindling resources. For New York culture hounds, that will mean their favorite museums will have fewer—and less ambitious—shows and special programs, as well as shorter hours.

Read more from their website:

http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20090201/SMALLBIZ/302019985

About Hui

Wang Hui lived from 1632 - 1717 and followed in the footprints of his great grandfathers, grandfather, father and uncles and learned painting at a very early age. He was later taught by two contemporary masters, Zhang Ke and Wang Shimin, who taught him to work in the tradition of copying famous Chinese paintings. This is most likely the reason why critics claim that his work is conservative and reflects the Yuan and Song traditions. One critic claimed that "his landscape paintings reflect his nostalgic attachment to classical Chinese aesthetics. Along with the other Wangs, Wang Hui helped to perpetuate the tradition of copying the ancient masters rather than creating original work.

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