Luis Jimenez

Working States of Luis Jiménez Self Portrait at Flatbed Press

But Jimenez spare no mercy on how the public should see him and his legacy, with the ultimatum of death. He had been no strangers to controversies – Determined to move his art out to the public, he worked on fiberglass monuments for many commissioned public installation by mixing high art with popular, and sometimes low, art. But here , unlike his provocative, rapturous public work, he presented him as an aging man, frail and vulnerable, staring outward. The double imagery that blends the living with the dead is striking, because it is visually uneasy. It is uneasy, because it is true, like his other public work that has been criticized as vulgar, violent or politically incorrect.

Sue Severson, Hollidaysburg

Big Cities in A Small Town — Sue Severson Exhibition at Gallery 321, Hollidaysburg PA

Sue Severson’s posthumous exhibition at Gallery 321 isn’t something you would expect in Hollidaysburg, a quintessential Pennsylvania place famous for its Victorian architecture and small town charm. Through her work, Severson brings the big city bustle to the mix. Severson was not a native. A Brooklynite who went to the Art Student League and Brooklyn […]

Dallas Art Fair, 2017 Edition

Not everyone knows what to expect when they are invited to the Dallas Art Fair. One guest was expecting something more like the Fort Worth Arts Festival. Another went to the Deep Ellum Arts Festival by mistake but realized their error only when they couldn’t find the correct booth number (the heavy metal music should have also […]

Talavera Pottery at Crow Collection of Asian Art

The show coincides with an election stirred by a rhetoric promoting nationalism, in the phrase of “America First”. Apolitical as it may seem, Talavera pottery states that cultural identities are sediments of innovation and development, through generations of both indigenous and foreign minds, all becoming possible when the world revolves into one global community. Sure, Chinese, Muslim, and Europeans all have left their marks on this pottery, so what? In the end, it is uniquely and truly Mexican.