Not Enough Time –Antiquing in Round Top, Spring, 2017

It has been a conundrum for us between the two largest shows in Round Top. We have always admired Red Barn show, but we end up finding more to bring home from Marburger Farm every time. We have never been disappointed by visiting Round Top (except the speed trap near Rosebud and Lott), and the friendship formed between collectors and dealers are only strengthened through these unique events. I wish that we could have more time, maybe sip some coffee, chat with friends, and watch some longhorns grazing afar.

Portraiture by Kim Brewer

Portraits by Kim Brewer

Handcrafts have traditionally been associated with feminine activities, especially in a domestic setting. Brewer nevertheless embraces low art into her artistic pursuit. In her own modest words, she is not a master of any medium, but she is willing to let each medium guide her into a terrain unknown, searching for her own artistic voice.

Texas Art Collector On Tap for August

The Show and Sale of Early Texas Art will be back at the Fort Worth Community Arts Center August 8-9, 2014. Now run by Vintage Promotions, LLC the show was produced for more than a decade of production by the Collectors of Fort Worth Art. The Texas Art Collector Show and Sale of Early Texas […]

Texas Regionalism Amon Carter: Otis Dozier (1904–1987) Untitled, 1932 Watercolor © Denni Davis Washburn, William R. Miegel Jr., and Elizabeth Marie Miegel Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas Purchase with funds provided by the Paper Guild of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Texas Regionalism Coming to the Amon Carter Museum

The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth will present an installation of Texas paintings that curators say captures a pivotal moment in the state’s cultural history. In the 1930s, a group of young artists—including Jerry Bywaters, Alexandre Hogue, William Lester, Thomas Stell, Harry Carnohan and Coreen Spellman, among others—gained national recognition for […]

Nature Observed: The Coastal California Pines of Anne C. Weary

They reflected the superlative power of the artist to synthesize geographic and flora information; yet still there seemed to lack a kind of immediacy and emotional attachment. In a tightly controlled process for public picture making, by reigning subconscious and psychological state, Anne achieved a stunning degree of intellectual revelation of nature observed.